What does genderfluid mean?

I’ve been a bit busy lately, so I didn’t write a post today. (I’m grateful to the scheduling feature of the blog software for allowing phantom-me to post for most of the time while I was busy.) However, I did write a page on the definition of genderfluidity.

Genderfluid is a name for a gender identity that, simply speaking, moves between multiple genders. This can be any number of any genders, and can happen very quickly, very slowly, or anywhere in between.

To read the more in-depth parts, check out the page here.

I’d love to hear your comment. I’m Ari and my pronouns are they/them.

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The importance of listening to communities for definitions

I don’t usually swear on here, but as a bisexual person, it irritates the f*ck out of me when I read the “definition” for bisexual as being “sexually attracted to both men and women.” It irritates me because then people will tell bi people like me that that’s true, and that what we define bisexuality as is not valid.

This doesn’t just happen for bisexuals, of course. Dictionaries (and, by extension, their readers) seem to have a habit of defining sexual orientations and gender identities independently from what the people that identify as them actually have to say.

For example, look at the definition of genderfluid on Google. It says a genderfluid person is “a person who does not identify themselves as having a fixed gender.” This seems okay at the first glance, but then you realize that it never actually claims that it’s a gender. Alas, Google says gender is “the state of being male or female.”

Meanwhile, a blog titled “Genderfluid Support” has a definition of “the feeling of fluidity within your gender identity; feeling a different gender as time passes or as situations change; not restricted to any number of genders.” Note that this says “within your gender identity,” and thus is not denying that it’s a gender like Google is.

And this, unfortunately, happens for almost every single identity. If it’s not even in the dictionary, it happens when people talk to each other and spread false ideas about what some of these words mean.

The lesson that people need to learn from this is that when it comes to identities, one needs to listen to the people that actually identify as them.

I’d love to hear what you have to say in the comments. I’m Ari, they/them.

Are non-binary people trans?

This question seems to be answered quite differently depending on who you ask. However, my standpoint is that non-binary people are transgender.

If we look at the definition for “transgender,” it says a trans person is “a person whose sense of personal identity and gender does not correspond with their birth sex.” Non-binary people’s genders are obviously different than their birth sexes (unless you’re intersex and you consider that your gender).

Also, believing that you have to go from one binary gender to the other to be transgender seems like a form of gatekeeping. Gatekeeping is most certainly what you don’t want to be doing, as there are countless blog posts showing.

Judging by the fact that the definition doesn’t place this restriction of binary genders on being trans, one can tell that yes, non-binary people are transgender.

I would love to hear your comments, thoughts, experiences, suggestions, etc. in the comments section below. I’m Ari, they/them.

How genderfluid and bigender are different

Note: this is from the perspective of someone who identifies as genderfluid, and is completely subjective, as is anything trying to define identities.

This is actually going to be rather short, as this is a fairly simple difference.

Genderfluid people’s gender changes with time, no matter how fast or slow, and no matter what or how many genders it goes to.

Bigender people are two genders, and it may change with time.

Genderfluid and bigender can be very similar. The key distinctions are that genderfluid people’s gender is changing in all instances, and bigender people’s gender is two genders in all instances. (bigender people, please correct me if I’m wrong about this)

In my case, I’m genderfluid, but with that, I’m bigender at some times. For me, when I’m bigender, I feel male and female simultaneously. (There is really no way to explain how it feels.) People who identify as bigender can feel two genders simultaneously like that, or drift between the two, similarly to genderfluidity.

Hopefully, I explained this well. Leave any comments you might have in the comments section, including any corrections you may have. I’m Ari, they/them.

Why genderfluid’s definition needs to include non-binary genders

It’s great to see genderfluid people represented and included in the media, online dictionaries, etc. However, an issue that I think people need to realize is that genderfluid people don’t only shift between female and male; we can also be other genders.

For example, in most instances, I feel what probably could be described as bigender, but sometimes I feel simply male. (I was AMAB.) I have only felt completely female on a few occasions. (The most notable of these was a couple years ago, when I felt quite female for a while, which led me to believe I was all-out MtF (male to female) trans, which turned out to not be right. Prior to that, I had felt 100% male. Afterwards, I slowly began realizing my gender identity as I know it now.)

I’m certainly not the only genderfluid person that is sometimes binary and sometimes non-binary. (or always non-binary.) If you search on Google, you can see other people who are like that posting online. And, if you read their posts, you’ll notice they’re usually by people confused by the popular, incorrect male-female definition of genderfluid. This is why we need a more inclusive definition of genderfluid.

As always, I would love to hear your constructive criticism, feedback, thoughts, and experiences in the comments section. You can call me Ari, and my pronouns are they/them.